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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/864

Title: The relationship between optimism and work-family enrichment and their influence on psychological well-being
Authors: Dyson-Washington, Faith
Keywords: Clinical psychology;Optimism;Well-being
Issue Date: 27-Jul-2006
Abstract: Objectives: The majority of research examining the intersection of work and family has focused on work-family conflict. Based on the scarcity hypothesis, this line of research assumes that the responsibilities and demands of work and family are incompatible. Presently, research in this area has shifted from the scarcity hypothesis to the enhancement hypothesis. Subsequently, researchers are beginning to explore ways in which work and family domains enhance or enrich each other. In addition, researchers are exploring how individual differences can influence whether or not an individual experiences work-family enrichment. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to add to the current work-family literature in three ways. First, the relationship between optimism and work-family enrichment was explored as well as the more frequently studied work-family conflict. Second, the relationship between optimism, work-family enrichment and various psychological well-being measures was explored (i.e., family satisfaction, job satisfaction and life satisfaction). Third, work-family enrichment was examined as a possible mediator between optimism and psychological well-being (i.e., family satisfaction, job satisfaction and life satisfaction). Method: Participants consisted of 230 students, staff and faculty within Drexel University’s College of Nursing and Health Professions. Participants were recruited through a mass email that invited participants to complete an anonymous survey and provided a link to the survey website. Results: Findings suggest that optimism is positively associated with work-to-family enrichment and family-to-work enrichment. Optimism was also positively associated with job satisfaction, family satisfaction and life satisfaction. On the other hand, work-to-family enrichment and family-to-work enrichment were not associated with the specific hypothesized satisfaction outcomes. Results also indicated that work-to-family enrichment and family-to-work enrichment partially mediated the relationship between optimism and satisfaction outcomes. Lastly, findings suggested that family-to-work enrichment was negatively associated with psychological strain. Conclusions: The present study offers a contribution to the work-family literature by examining the often understudied concept of work-family enrichment. Furthermore, the current study was among the first studies to examine optimism as an individual difference related to the experience of work-family enrichment. Implications and future directions are explored.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/864
Appears in Collections:Drexel Theses and Dissertations

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