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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/337

Title: Effect of non-cognitive and social environmental factors on the retention of under-represented minority students in engineering and technology-related disciplines
Authors: Rocheleau, Suzanne Elyse
Keywords: Education;College dropouts—Prevention;Minorities in engineering
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2004
Abstract: The failure of American colleges and universities to retain African American, Hispanic and American Indian students in engineering and technology – related disciplines is a significant problem that poses a threat to America’s global technological leadership. The purpose of this study was to examine the non-cognitive and university-related social and environmental factors that under-represented minority college students enrolled in engineering and technology-related disciplines believed had contributed to their academic success and college retention. Forty-nine current and former NACME Vanguard Scholars at the focus university were surveyed using an Internet-based research instrument and twelve participated in focus groups. The researcher-generated survey included the Non-Cognitive Questionnaire (NCQ), and replicated the studies of William E. Sedlacek, Ph.D. Results indicate that academic success and college retention could not be explained by background characteristics of race, gender, socioeconomic status, parental education, high school GPA and course pattern or SAT scores. Respondents credited non-cognitive abilities for their success and achieved above average scores on four non-cognitive ability scales. Campus support and advising programs were relevant to the development of noncognitive abilities. In particular, cohort participation provided a micro-environment that strengthened and supported participants, enabling them to achieve the academic and social integration necessary for academic success and college retention.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/337
Appears in Collections:Drexel Theses and Dissertations

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