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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/2901

Title: Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles
Authors: Bahadory, Mozhgan
Keywords: Chemistry;Nanoparticles -- Synthesis;Nanoparticles
Issue Date: 23-Oct-2008
Abstract: Improved methods were developed for the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles. Laboratory experiments were designed for introducing of nanotechnology into the undergraduate curriculum. An optimal set of conditions for the synthesis of clear yellow colloidal silver was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by borohydride reduction of silver nitrate, a method which produces particles with average size of 12±2 nm, determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The plasmon absorbance is at 397 nm and the peak width at half maximum (PWHM) is 70-75 nm. The relationship between aggregation and optical properties was determined along with a method to protect the particles using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). A laboratory experiment was designed in which students synthesize yellow colloidal silver, estimate particle size using visible spectroscopy, and study aggregation effects. The synthesis of the less stable copper nanoparticles is more difficult because copper nanopaticles are easily oxidized. Four methods were used for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles, including chemical reduction with sodium borohydride, sodium borohydride with potassium iodide, isopropyl alcohol with cetyltrimethylammonium bormide (CTAB) and reducing sugars. The latter method was also the basis for an undergraduate laboratory experiment. For each reaction, the dependence of stability of the copper nanoparticles on reagent concentrations, additives, relative amounts of reactants, and temperature is explored. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM and UV-Visible Spectroscopy were used to characterize the copper nanoparticles. A laboratory experiment to produce copper nanoparticles from household chemicals was developed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/2901
Appears in Collections:Drexel Theses and Dissertations

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