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iDEA: Drexel E-repository and Archives > Drexel Academic Community > College of Engineering > Department of Materials Science and Engineering > Faculty Research and Publications (MSE) > Supporting information for: "Instability and transport of metal catalyst in the growth of tapered silicon nanowires"

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/1194

Title: Supporting information for: "Instability and transport of metal catalyst in the growth of tapered silicon nanowires"
Authors: Spanier, Jonathan E.
Cao, Linyou
Garipcan, Bora
Atchison, Jennifer S.
Ni, Chaoying
Nabet, Bahram
Keywords: Semiconductor Nanowires;Doped Silicon;Nanotubes;Surface;Limit;Gold
Issue Date: 13-Sep-2006
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Citation: Nano Letters, 6(9): pp. 1852-1857. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl060533r
Abstract: During metal-catalyzed growth of tapered silicon nanowires, or silicon nanocones (SiNCs), Au-Si eutectic particles are seen to undergo significant and reproducible reductions in their diameters. The reductions are accompanied by the transfer of eutectic droplet mass to adjacent, initially metal catalyst-free substrates, producing secondary nucleation and growth of SiNCs. Remarkably, the catalyst particle diameters on the SiNCs grown on the adjacent substrates are strongly correlated with those on the SiNCs grown on the initially Au-nanoparticle-coated substrate. These post-growth nanoparticle sizes depend on temperature and are found to be independent of the initial nanoparticle sizes. Our modeling and analysis indicates that the size reduction and mass transfer could be explained by electrostatic charge-induced dissociation of the droplet. The reduction in size enables the controlled growth of SiNCs with tip sharpnesses approaching the atomic scale, indicating that metal-catalyst nanoparticles can play an even more dynamic role than previously thought, and suggesting additional modes of control of shape, and of nucleation and growth location.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/1194
Appears in Collections:Faculty Research and Publications (MSE)

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