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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/1092

Title: The effect of live infant directed singing on the heart rate, oxygen saturation level and respiration rate of premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit
Authors: Courtnage, Alesya
Keywords: Heart Rate -- in infancy & childhood;Infant, Premature, Diseases -- therapy;Intensive Care Units, Neonatal;Music Therapy -- methods.
Issue Date: May-2001
Abstract: Studies have shown that the combination of stress, pain, isolation from the mother, aversive environmental stimuli and multiple caregivers, which are all characteristics of the NICU environment, may negatively affect the premature neonate's general state of health The purpose of this study was to establish whether live, infant directed singing could be used as a non-invasive, natural form of infant regulation. Subjects were 10 infants born prematurely (less than 37 weeks gestation). Subjects served as their own control and were sung to and held simultaneously, then held only for approximately 15 minutes. Heart rate, oxygen saturation levels and respiration rate was recorded for each minute before, during, in between and after both interventions. The hypothesis was that infant directed singing would decrease heart rate and increase oxygen saturation levels and respiration rate. Results from this study indicate a statistically significant increase in heart rate during the Singing & Holding phase as compared to the Holding Alone phase, thus the hypothesis was rejected. There was no statistically significant change in the oxygen saturation levels or respiratory rate of the 10 infants studied. It is suggested that the elevated heart rate during the Singing & Holding phase may be due to the fact that the subjects were awake and oriented to the stimulus being provided. Findings suggest that this method may address stimulation needs of the infant that may go unmet in the NICU. Suggestions for future research were made.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1860/1092
Appears in Collections:Health Sciences Theses and Dissertations

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